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Author Topic: mp siin - kui sul ei ole midagi asjalikku öelda, tee seda mujal.  (Read 134874 times)

mp

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Re: mp siin - kui sul ei ole midagi asjalikku öelda, tee seda mujal.
« Reply #690 on: June 08, 2018, 08:28:59 »


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29847532

J Strength Cond Res. 2018 May 25. doi: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000002648.
Restrictive Breathing Mask Reduces Repetitions to Failure During a Session of Lower-Body Resistance Exercise.

"A significant decrease was found in total repetitions during the RBM condition (p < 0.01). A majority of the decrease in repetitions to failure occurred in the squat (p < 0.05) and in the leg press (p < 0.01), whereas no difference was observed in leg extension (p = 0.214). A significant increase was observed in S-RPE during the RBM session (p < 0.01). A significant increase was found in prestress (p < 0.01) and poststress (p = 0.01) in the RBM session. No significant difference existed for HR between exercise sessions (p = 0.08). A significant decrease existed in pulse oximetry during the RBM session (p < 0.01). The use of an RBM had a negative effect on the number of repetitions completed during an acute session of lower-body resistance training."



Not a good idea to wear a breathing mask when lifting



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mp

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Re: mp siin - kui sul ei ole midagi asjalikku öelda, tee seda mujal.
« Reply #691 on: June 10, 2018, 19:37:13 »



Cut my training volume in half - made better gains - Why doing more volume is not always the answer
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mp

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Re: mp siin - kui sul ei ole midagi asjalikku öelda, tee seda mujal.
« Reply #692 on: June 27, 2018, 19:37:15 »


https://peerj.com/articles/5020/

Effects of equal-volume resistance training with different training frequencies in muscle size and strength in trained men

Conclusion
Trained men that are used to training at higher frequencies could benefit from decreasing training frequency when pursuing muscle hypertrophy. Considering that the results seem to be related to an unaccustomed stimulus, coaches and athletes might consider including variations in training frequency, while keeping the number of weekly sets constant, in their training programs in order to overcome plateaus in muscle hypertrophy. Moreover, reducing training frequency may also be an efficient strategy to reduce time commitment without interfering with the results
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mp

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Re: mp siin - kui sul ei ole midagi asjalikku öelda, tee seda mujal.
« Reply #693 on: June 29, 2018, 10:10:26 »


http://www.eceondemand.org/#!resources/effects-of-zinc-magnesium-and-vitamin-b6-zma-supplementation-on-serum-igf-i-igfbp-3-and-testosterone-concentrations-in-young-athletes-0bf19bc1-2b91-4df2-9180-cc10919952cf

Endocrine Abstracts (2018) 56 P665 | DOI: 10.1530/endoabs.56.P665
Effects of zinc, magnesium and vitamin B6 (ZMA) supplementation on serum IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and Testosterone concentrations in young athletes


Conclusion: The findings suggest that extra doses of the micronutrients present in the ZMA DO NOT bring any additional benefits, either in the body composition or in the hormonal levels in subjects under adequate diet.
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mp

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Re: mp siin - kui sul ei ole midagi asjalikku öelda, tee seda mujal.
« Reply #694 on: June 30, 2018, 08:57:29 »

Normalizing low vitaminD3 levels w/ 2800 IU/d may do MORE HARM THAN GOOD for postmenopausal women's muscle

A recent study aimed to investigate effects of vitamin D3 supplementation on above-mentioned outcomes in healthy community-dwelling postmenopausal women with plasma levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) below < 50 nmol/l and high parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels.

Participants (N = 81) were 1:1 treated with vitamin D3, 70 µg (2800 IU)/day or identical placebo for three months during wintertime (56°N).

Vitamin D3 supplementation increased levels of 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D by 230% (95% CI 189 to 272)%, p < 0.001 and 58% (190 to 271%), p < 0.001, respectively, and reduced PTH by 17% (− 23 to − 11%), p < 0.001. Compared with placebo, vitamin D3 significantly reduced maximal handgrip strength by 9% (− 15 to − 3%; p < 0.01) and knee flexion strength by 13% (− 24 to − 2%; p = 0.02) and increased the time spent on performing the Timed Up and Go test by 4.4%; (0.1–8.6%; p < 0.05).

Levels of physical activity, total lean body mass, appendicular lean mass index, postural stability, well-being, and quality of life did not change in response to treatment. Compared with placebo, a daily supplement with a relatively high dose of vitamin D3 had no beneficial effects on any outcomes.

"In some measures of muscle strength and physical performance, we even saw a small unfavorable effect," the scientists warn and add: "Our data call for caution on use of relatively high daily doses of vitamin D3 in the treatment of vitamin D insufficiency."

 https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00223-018-0443-z
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