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Author Topic: mp siin - kui sul ei ole midagi asjalikku öelda, tee seda mujal.  (Read 85286 times)

mp

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Re: mp siin - kui sul ei ole midagi asjalikku öelda, tee seda mujal.
« Reply #450 on: May 27, 2017, 10:50:03 »


http://tau.amegroups.com/article/view/13624/14797

Testosterone Deficiency in Adults and Corresponding Treatment Patterns Across The Globe
The global prevalence of testosterone deficiency (TD) ranges from 10-40%. The actual diagnosis of TD is controversial, as a wide range of total testosterone (TT) thresholds are used for diagnosis (200-400 ng/dL), and physicians differ in their emphasis placed on clinical symptoms.
There are also significant global differences in the prescription patterns of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). In the United States, prescription of TRT is significantly higher than the rest of the world, increasing 3-fold over the last 10 years and more so in eugonadal men. The majority of treating physicians emphasizes clinical symptomology of TD over laboratory values, and up to one-fourth of their patients do not even have serum testosterone levels. There are significant inter-physician differences in willingness to prescribe TRT in the setting of prostate cancer.
Data is scarce on testosterone prescribing patterns in Africa, Asia, and the Middle East. More literature is needed to better characterize how physicians from different regions diagnose TD.
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mp

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Re: mp siin - kui sul ei ole midagi asjalikku öelda, tee seda mujal.
« Reply #451 on: May 29, 2017, 12:30:17 »


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28419159

CONCLUSIONS:
Our findings indicated that potassium supplementation is a safe medication with no important adverse effects that has a modest but significant impact BP and may be recommended as an adjuvant antihypertensive agent for patients with essential hypertension.
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mp

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Re: mp siin - kui sul ei ole midagi asjalikku öelda, tee seda mujal.
« Reply #452 on: June 09, 2017, 19:47:13 »


1234
« Last Edit: June 12, 2017, 22:08:30 by mp »
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mp

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Re: mp siin - kui sul ei ole midagi asjalikku öelda, tee seda mujal.
« Reply #453 on: June 12, 2017, 22:00:28 »

http://journals.lww.com/nsca-jscr/Abstract/publishahead/Partial_range_of_motion_exercise_is_effective_for.95936.aspx

These results suggest that intramuscular hypoxia might facilitate muscular hypertrophy with PRE being more effective than FRE.

PRE - Partial range of motion FRE - Full range of motion

-------------------------------------------

* provides speculation that maintaining constant tension on muscle enhances results

« Last Edit: June 12, 2017, 22:03:31 by mp »
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mp

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Re: mp siin - kui sul ei ole midagi asjalikku öelda, tee seda mujal.
« Reply #454 on: June 12, 2017, 22:08:40 »


http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fphys.2017.00390/full

BCAA alone stimulate protein synthesis following resistance training, but 50 % less effectively than whey protein, and all essential amino acids would be needed for a maximal response of muscle protein synthesis.
Muscular protein synthesis after an intake of 5.6 grams of BCAA following a leg workout was only 22 % higher than placebo.

Despite their popularity as supplements, this was the first study that has investigated the impact of isolated branched-chain amino acids (BCAA's) on muscle protein synthesis (MPS) rates.

The ingestion of 5.6 g BCAA resulted in a 22% increase in MPS.

This increase in MPS is relatively little.

When you consume about 20-25 g whey protein (which would provide approximately the same amount of BCAA), you would get approximately double the increase in MPS.

These data suggest that you need a full complement of the EAA to get a maximal increase in MPS.


So BCAAs on their own are NOT super effective.

And previous research has suggested that the addition of BCAAs to protein is not as effective as only adding the BCAA LEUCINE on its own (the other two BCAA appear to compete for absorption), or simply consuming more protein.

In other words, is doesn't seem there are conditions in which BCAA supplementation is the preferred choice if your goal is to maximize MPS.
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mp

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Re: mp siin - kui sul ei ole midagi asjalikku öelda, tee seda mujal.
« Reply #455 on: June 16, 2017, 12:01:04 »


http://suppversity.blogspot.com.ee/2017/06/will-partial-reps-give-you-those.html

http://bayesianbodybuilding.com/keep-tension-muscles/
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mp

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Re: mp siin - kui sul ei ole midagi asjalikku öelda, tee seda mujal.
« Reply #456 on: June 23, 2017, 10:14:23 »


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5422691/
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mp

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Re: mp siin - kui sul ei ole midagi asjalikku öelda, tee seda mujal.
« Reply #457 on: June 24, 2017, 14:37:44 »


"Squatting Shoes W/ Raised Heel = More GymBro'cious Claims that'll Make You Waste Your Money -- Heel-Raised Foot Posture Does Not Affect Trunk and Lower Extremity Biomechanics During Barbell Back Squat in Recreational Weightlifters.
It is claimed that weightlifting shoes with a raised heel may lead to a more upright trunk posture, and thus reduce the risk of back injuries during a barbell back squat. These proclaimed biomechanical effects have not been thoroughly investigated. A recent study that compared the lower extremity biomechanics during barbell back squats in 3 foot postures shows - that's as 90% of the marketin' claims in the fitness community 100% bogus.
14 recreational weightlifters (7 male and 7 female) between the ages of 18-50 performed barbell back squats in 3 conditions (barefoot on a flat surface, barefoot on a heel-raised platform, and wearing heel-raised weightlifting shoes) at 80% of their 1-RM. Surface electromyography (EMG) was used to assess the activation of the knee extensors and paraspinal muscles at L3 and T12 spinal levels. A 3D motion capture system and an electrogoniometer recorded the kinematics of the thoracic spine, lumbar spine, and knee during the back squat to a depth where the hip was at least at the same level to the knee.
Results indicated that none of the heel-raised foot postures significantly affected trunk and lower extremity muscle activation [thoracolumbar paraspinal (p=0.52), lumbar paraspinal (p=0.179), knee extensor (p=0.507)] or the trunk angles [thoracolumbar spine (p=0.348), lumbar spine (p=0.283)] during the squat.
"Our results demonstrated that during barbell back squats, heel-raised foot postures do not significantly affect spinal and knee extensor muscle activations, and trunk and knee kinematics. Heel-raised weightlifting shoes are unlikely to provide significant protection against back injuries for recreational weightlifters during the barbell back squat," the scientists conclude."

Lee, Szu-Ping; et al. "Heel-Raised Foot Posture Do Not Affect Trunk And Lower Extremity Biomechanics During A Barbell Back Squat In Recreational Weightlifters." Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research: Post Acceptance: June 19, 2017 - doi: 10.1519/JSC.0000000000001938
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mp

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Re: mp siin - kui sul ei ole midagi asjalikku öelda, tee seda mujal.
« Reply #458 on: June 26, 2017, 16:19:48 »

(Super-)slow training and its inferior effects on early-phase satellite cell and myonuclear domain adaptation (Herman-Montemayor. 2015) --

Herman-Montemayor, Jennifer R., et al. "Early-phase satellite cell and myonuclear domain adaptations to slow-speed versus traditional resistance training programs." Journal of strength and conditioning research/National Strength & Conditioning Association

The purpose of one of the latest studies from the Rocky Vista University was to identify adaptations in satellite cell (SC) content and myonuclear domain (MND) after 6-week slow-speed vs. “normal-speed” resistance training programs.

To this ends, thirty-four untrained women were divided into slow speed (SS), traditional strength (TS), traditional muscular endurance (TE), and nontraining control (C) groups. The ladies performed a leg work consisting of three sets of each of the following exercises twice per week in the first and thrice per week in the fifth week: Leg press, squat, and knee extensions. To investigate how the way these workouts were performed would affect the adaptive response, the scientists randomly assigned their subjects to four different groups:
The Super-Slow (SS) group performed 6– 10 repetition maximum (6–10RM) for each set with 10-second concentric (con) and 4-second eccentric (ecc) contractions for each repetition.
The Traditional Strength (TS) group and the Traditional Muscular Endurance (TE) group who performed 6–10RM and 20–30RM, respectively, at “normal” speed (1–2 seconds per con and ecc contractions).
The sedentary control group (C) which did not work out at all.
To allow for a similar number of reps in the TS and SS group, the intensity (=weight used) in the SS group was reduced to the same 40–60% of the 1RM that was also used in the TE group. The TS group, on the other hand trained at 80–85% 1RM.
What do the changes in fiber type satellite cell increases actually tell us? Unfortunately, the answer to this question is by no means straight forward. In conjunction with the overall increase in domain sizes, cross sectional fiber size and myonuclear domain numbers (see Figure 1) the increased satellite cell recruitement in the traditional training group does yet support its superiority over super-slow training (learn more about satellite cells).
I know that this is not ideal, but there's no way you do 6-10 reps with a time-under-tension (TUT) of 10-0-4 with the same weight you'd do 6-10 reps at a normal TUT of 1-0-1 or 2-0-2, accordingly, the results the scientists' analysis of the pretraining and posttraining muscle biopsies the authors analyzed for fiber cross-sectional area, fiber type, SC content, myonuclear number, and MND still have practical relevance.

And what does the scientists' analysis tell us? Well, along with the data in Figure 1, the exclusive increase in satellite cell content of type I, IIA, fibers (IIX and IIAX increased in both SS and TS, but not TE or control) that was observed in the traditional strength (TS) training group appears to confirm the superiority of this way of training when it comes to lying the foundations of further myonuclear domain growth (learn more in the "Muscle Hypertrophy 101").

The fact that myonuclear domain increases of type I, IIAX, and IIX fibers occurred exclusively in the TS, yet not in the SS group, where only the domains of the type IIA fibers increased, does still appear to confirm the common prejudice that - for the average trainee - training at higher times under tension (TUTs) does not offer benefits that suggest faster or more robust size gains.
Compared to strength-endurance training, however, super-slow training is still the better option.

On a "per load basis" it is thus more effective to do fewer reps slower vs. more reps at a normal speed if your goal is to "grow"
muscle.

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mp

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Re: mp siin - kui sul ei ole midagi asjalikku öelda, tee seda mujal.
« Reply #459 on: June 27, 2017, 16:38:13 »


http://sci-fit.net/2017/bodybuilding-study-collection/


Collection Of 70+ Bodybuilding Studies: Nutrition, Health, Contest Prep

Summary And Overview:

*Many bodybuilders use anabolic steroids despite long-term health concerns

*Protein requirements for bodybuilders are in all likelihood higher than population recommendations

*Common supplements include protein powder, creatine, “fat burners”, multivitaminerals, fish oil, BCAAs, caffeine, and more. Some of these supplements have more evidence for benefits than others.

*Some bodybuilders supplemented too much: “intakes of some micronutrients were excessive (~1000% of US Recommended Dietary Allowance) and above the tolerable upper limit.” (Spendlove et al., 2015)

*Bodybuilders may be more prone to body dissatisfaction and excessive worrying about general appearance, muscle mass, and body fat

*Muscle loss, mood disturbance, and hormonal imbalances may occur during restrictive contest prep. Especially as body fat drops to low levels (i.e. below ~5-8% in men): “severe energy restriction to extremely low body energy reserves decreases significantly the concentrations of 3 anabolic pathways despite high protein intake” (Maestu et al., 2010)

*“Bodybuilders partake in a multitude of practices that may place them in high-risk health categories” (Kleiner et al., 1990)
Eating disorders can be an issue for both men and women, but the disorders might show themselves differently

*Muscle dysmorphia is the condition where individuals “interpret their body size as both small or weak even though they may look normal or highly muscular” (Foster et al., 2015). “It remains unclear whether these characteristics are exacerbated by bodybuilding, or whether individuals with these characteristics are attracted to the bodybuilding context.” (Mitchell et al., 2016)

*Several research groups now suggest that muscle dysmorphia may be influenced and perhaps caused by bullying, negative comments about ones body, etc.

*Check out the recommendations section for practical tips
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mp

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Re: mp siin - kui sul ei ole midagi asjalikku öelda, tee seda mujal.
« Reply #460 on: July 04, 2017, 12:04:34 »

http://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/Abstract/publishahead/Effects_of_Two_Years_of_Calorie_Restriction_on.97174.aspx

Purpose: Calorie restriction (CR) improves health span and delays age-related diseases in many species.

Results: The CR group achieved an average 11.9 +/- 0.7% CR during the 2y intervention. Body weight decreased in CR (-7.7 +/- 0.4 kg), but not AL (+0.2 +/- 0.5 kg).

 Strength results in CR were similar, with decreases in absolute flexor and extensor strength,

but increases when expressed relative to body mass.

No changes were observed for VO2max expressed relative to lean body mass or leg lean mass.

Conclusions: Two years of modest CR without a structured exercise component did not appear to compromise aerobic capacity in healthy non-obese adults. The clinical implications of the observed changes in VO2max and muscle strength will be important to explore in future studies.
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mp

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Re: mp siin - kui sul ei ole midagi asjalikku öelda, tee seda mujal.
« Reply #461 on: July 06, 2017, 15:25:49 »


http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2636710 Can a Diet That Mimics Fasting Turn Back the Clock?
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mp

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Re: mp siin - kui sul ei ole midagi asjalikku öelda, tee seda mujal.
« Reply #462 on: July 12, 2017, 10:43:51 »


Traditionally, bodybuilders have used short rest periods between sets of strength training exercise to increase fatigue, and to produce a greater muscle pump.
Importantly, it has been suggested that the cellular swelling effect that occurs during a muscle pump could produce a signaling cascade that increases muscular hypertrophy.
However, as this study shows, both muscle protein synthesis and mTOR signaling are reduced by using short rest periods, which indicates that the practice of taking short rests may not actually be optimal for muscle growth after all.
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mp

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Re: mp siin - kui sul ei ole midagi asjalikku öelda, tee seda mujal.
« Reply #463 on: July 12, 2017, 18:47:51 »


http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2017/07/11/bjsports-2017-097608  A systematic review, meta-analysis and meta-regression of the effect of protein supplementation on resistance training-induced gains in muscle mass and strength in healthy adults

Dietary protein supplementation significantly enhanced changes in muscle strength and size during prolonged RET in healthy adults. Increasing age reduces and training experience increases the efficacy of protein supplementation during RET.

With protein supplementation, protein intakes at amounts greater than ~1.6 g/kg/day do not further contribute RET-induced gains in FFM.
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mp

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Re: mp siin - kui sul ei ole midagi asjalikku öelda, tee seda mujal.
« Reply #464 on: July 17, 2017, 18:35:56 »


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28704882

Translation:

Strength then Endurance training -> better muscular results when done in evening compared to morning
Endurance then strength training -> better endurance results regardless of time
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